HELP: How to get started with CopperSpice?

Discuss issues related to installing or building
janwilmans
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Oct 16 2019 9:33 pm
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Re: HELP: How to get started with CopperSpice?

Post by janwilmans » Fri Nov 08 2019 10:30 am

If you are annoyed by a high cpu load or io-bandwidth consumption by mscv compilation, causing your system to be unresponsive, you can do this:

If you add this to the registry:

```
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\cl.exe]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\cl.exe\PerfOptions]
"CpuPriorityClass"=dword:00000005
"IoPriority"=dword:00000001

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\link.exe]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\link.exe\PerfOptions]
"CpuPriorityClass"=dword:00000005
"IoPriority"=dword:00000001
```

all compilation processes will be 'below normal' priority, which keeps you machine responsive, even under heavy compilation loads.

Also, if you want to tone it down even more, go to Options->Projects and Solutions->Build and Run
and set the maximum number of parallel project builds to a lower number, for example 2 instead of 8.
This does slow down the build, but in practice that might be better then having an unresponsive system.

ansel
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Apr 10 2015 8:23 am

Re: HELP: How to get started with CopperSpice?

Post by ansel » Fri Nov 08 2019 8:03 pm

janwilmans wrote:
Fri Nov 08 2019 10:30 am
If you add this to the registry:
I would like to note that this is for Windows MSVC builds only, and we do not advocate changing registry settings without evaluating the risks. This should only be done for testing and not for a release build.
Also, if you want to tone it down even more, go to Options->Projects and Solutions->Build and Run
and set the maximum number of parallel project builds to a lower number, for example 2 instead of 8.
This does slow down the build, but in practice that might be better then having an unresponsive system.
This is often a better solution in practice, because the Windows kernel seems to do much better when you leave at least one or two cores free for UI interaction and background tasks. The context switch process in Windows is fairly expensive.

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